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Fibromyalgia, or the pain that society does not see and understand

Fibromyalgia was recognized as a disease by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1992. Today, fibromyalgia affects 4% of the population, and almost 90% are women. Fibromyalgia is considered an “invisible disease” because it affects all the soft parts of the musculoskeletal system and cannot be easily diagnosed through medical tests. Indeed, fibromyalgia is not visible, does not leave traces on…

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Fibromyalgia: “Learning to live with the omnipresence of pain”

On the occasion of World Fibromyalgia Recognition Day, Léa looks back on the three years of medical wandering she had to face before putting a name to her pain. Léa, a 25-year-old woman, was diagnosed with fibromyalgia in 2011, three years after developing the syndrome. “Fibromyalgia is having pain everywhere, all the time, without a minute’s respite,” explains Léa. This orphan disease characterized by…

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Is Fibromyalgia a Real Thing? Or Should You Be Skeptical?

Controversy has swirled around the disorder for years. However, the effectiveness of fibromyalgia syndrome treatment is making doubters believe. Like many of his colleagues, John Kissel, M.D., used to think that fibromyalgia wasn’t a real condition. Dr. Kissel, a neurologist and the co-director of the MDA/ALS Center at Ohio State University, thought it was a “wastebasket” diagnosis—a dumping ground for…

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For those who don’t understand fibromyalgia

What should you know about fibromyalgia? Fibromyalgia is not a new type of disease. Fibromyalgia was first described in 1815 by William Balfour, a surgeon at the University of Edinburgh. Over time, it was described as chronic rheumatism, myalgia, or fibrosis. Unlike diseases, syndromes like fibromyalgia have no known cause, but are a group of signs and symptoms that are unfortunately present in…

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